not all who wander are lost- especially if you wander spinning poetry and musing about the deep and nerdy things of this world...

 

I’m having waaaaay too much fun on YouTube Gifmaker 

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Me watching the Legend of Korra Book 1 finale 

I was a wee befuddled

pencilpaperpassion:

desnascuffs101:

imsozarry:

OMG I KNOW WHY THEY ZOOMED IN KUVIRA LIKE SHE WAS SUCH AN IMPORTANT CHARACTER LOOK :O

she’s a love child!

AND THEY EVEN PLAYED SOME WEIRD MUSIC.

WAIT WHAT THE HELL IS GOING ON?????????????

I’M GLAD I’M NOT THE ONLY ONE

It still constantly amazes me how different Korra and Aang’s worlds are, and how the role of the Avatar is changing

(Source: korrastyle)

korratic:

asamiandtoomanymuses:

thesimplethings1:

DON’T FUCKING TOUCH ME

JUST…..DON’T

as if the finale wasn’t enough…they extended it

WHY DID THAT PERSON CREATE THE ALTERNATE ENDING

whoever made this, you’re officially kicked out of the fandom for causing hazardous feels. 

comicsalliance:

THE UNCERTAINTY OF CHANGE: A CLOSER LOOK AT THE ‘LEGEND OF KORRA’ BOOK 3 FINALE
By Juliet Kahn
I re-watched “Sozin’s Comet” last night, in the wake of The Legend of Korra’s third season finale. It was still wonderful, still grand and gorgeous and heavy with emotion. But it felt different this time. It felt…funnier.
And really, it is. Avatar: The Last Airbender‘s four-episode finale starts with a beach party. Sokka cracks jokes as he scrambles across a crumbling airship. The last spoken line is a blind joke. It is clear to me, in a way that it wasn’t when I first watched it, that these characters are young teens. Young teens dealing with genocidal dictatorships, Orwellian city-states and the general mayhem of war, absolutely, but their age lends the whole affair a constant, underlying levity. The adults that exist are kept at arm’s length from the action—present, but unmistakably marked as “grown-ups,” and thus distant. Youth, and all its connotations of hope and humor, are the engine of the show.
Legend of Korra, in contrast, is downright grim. The central team all falls between 17 and 20 years old, and 50-somethings like Lin and Tenzin are as present in the story as they are. Their relationships feel less timid, less blushy. Characters like Mako have solid careers and murky pasts involving gang membership. Azula was a terrifying and tragic villain, but baddies like Zaheer (and Amon, and Unalaq) wield philosophical weight alongside their grinning evil.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

THE UNCERTAINTY OF CHANGE: A CLOSER LOOK AT THE ‘LEGEND OF KORRA’ BOOK 3 FINALE

By Juliet Kahn

I re-watched “Sozin’s Comet” last night, in the wake of The Legend of Korra’s third season finale. It was still wonderful, still grand and gorgeous and heavy with emotion. But it felt different this time. It felt…funnier.

And really, it is. Avatar: The Last Airbender‘s four-episode finale starts with a beach party. Sokka cracks jokes as he scrambles across a crumbling airship. The last spoken line is a blind joke. It is clear to me, in a way that it wasn’t when I first watched it, that these characters are young teens. Young teens dealing with genocidal dictatorships, Orwellian city-states and the general mayhem of war, absolutely, but their age lends the whole affair a constant, underlying levity. The adults that exist are kept at arm’s length from the action—present, but unmistakably marked as “grown-ups,” and thus distant. Youth, and all its connotations of hope and humor, are the engine of the show.

Legend of Korra, in contrast, is downright grim. The central team all falls between 17 and 20 years old, and 50-somethings like Lin and Tenzin are as present in the story as they are. Their relationships feel less timid, less blushy. Characters like Mako have solid careers and murky pasts involving gang membership. Azula was a terrifying and tragic villain, but baddies like Zaheer (and Amon, and Unalaq) wield philosophical weight alongside their grinning evil.

READ MORE

legionaru:

thisismyplacetobe:

A ‘Ring of Fire’ solar eclipse is a rare phenomenon that occurs when the moon’s orbit is at its apogee: the part of its orbit farthest away from the Earth. Because the moon is so far away, it seems smaller than normal to the human eye. The result is that the moon doesn’t entirely block out our view of the sun, but leaves an “annulus,” or ring of sunlight glowing around it. Hence the term  “annular” eclipse rather than a “total” eclipse.

Magic.

bulletproofteacup:

fallengrades:

Being handcuffed won’t stop Korra from being bamf

This entire fighting sequence blew my mind. Like, we also know Korra is an excellent bender, but this sequence showed us literally how skilled and creative Korra really is.

I spent the entire episode going omg omg because it was just so well animated and perfectly executed. Season three is the best chunk of Korra since the original series. I can’t wait for season four if we’re going to the same passionate, well made series.